The Fox Hunt – Sven Nordqvist

More in the Series – Findus
“More in the Series” scores the other books in a series where one (or more) of the books have made it into the 1001 Books list. Mostly because I’m a bit of a completionist. 

POINTS: 4 out of 10.

Bechdel: 0 points
Variety of characters: 0 points
Good story:  2 points
Discretionary ideological points: 2 points

The best part of this book (according to both C and me) is that every picture has a bunch of secret, hidden, awesome little interesting details. Chickens stepping out of picture frames, and trees shaped like musical instruments… it’s great fun. I really love it when picture books embrace the “picture” part of that description and have more going on than just a standard rendition of the text.

The relationship between Pettson and Findus is also totally frikkin’ wonderful. It has all that wonderful nuance of a friendship that has existed for years where you’ve learned all the other person’s little quirks and kind of indulge them in that gentle smiling “I see what you did there” way. It’s charming as hell.

I love how Findus keeps pushing Pettson to new heights of the ridiculous in his plan to scare the fox off, and you get the distinct impression that it is far more about amusing himself than it is about achieving the objective.

The book has no female characters, and no diversity at all to speak of, but it’s still 100% worth a read. I loved the fact that it gently implies that perhaps killing a fox who is just trying to feed himself is not entirely ethical. 😉 And the fact that when the trap is sprung it is the hunter Gustavsson who is caught in it and discouraged from his (fox-hunting) behaviour.

Charming, brilliant stuff. Well worth a read.

 

The Gruffalo’s Child – Julia Donaldson

More in the Series – Gruffalo
“More in the Series” scores the other books in a series where one (or more) of the books have made it into the 1001 Books list. Mostly because I’m a bit of a completionist. 

POINTS: 3 out of 10.

Bechdel: 0 points
Variety of characters: 0 points
Good story:  2 points
Discretionary ideological points: 1 point

Man, I love these books. Donaldson has that rare knack of writing light rhyming text that totally belies how hard it is to do right. Plus, I always love me a trickster tale, and the mouse in these books is absolutely a trickster.

In this one, the Gruffalo warns his daughter about the Big Bad Mouse, but she decides to go exploring to see for herself. She meets a variety of animals all of whom warn her that the Mouse is down by the lake eating Gruffalo cake (or similar). She finally finds the Mouse and is unimpressed by how little he is. However with the help of some clever shadow work, he manages to trick her into thinking that the Big Bad variety is right there and she runs home back and snuggles in with the Gruffalo again.

There’s no Bechdel pass, and no diversity to speak of. The characters (with the exception of the Gruffalos) are all woodland animals, and the only clear female is the child herself (who has no name of her own).

But it’s an awesome little tale about the trickster mouse, and the triumph of brains over brawn. Plus the text trips along so lightly, making it an utter pleasure to read out loud.

Highly recommended.

 

Babar’s ABC – Laurent de Brunhoff

More in the Series – Babar
“More in the Series” scores the other books in a series where one (or more) of the books have made it into the 1001 Books list. Mostly because I’m a bit of a completionist. 

POINTS: 2 out of 10.

Bechdel: 0 points
Variety of characters: 0 points
Good story:  2 points
Discretionary ideological points: 0 points

Alphabet books don’t really fit our metrics very well. It can’t pass the Bechdel, because there is no dialogue, and since all the characters (except the nice old lady who took Babar in) are animals, it’s hard to talk about diversity.

I will say that there is nothing in this book to suggest any awareness of any kind of cultures or ways of being other than a very white European one. The animals are all clothed in that style, the activities they engage in in the book are of European origin (despite most of them being African animals). While it’s not as overtly colonial as some of the story based books, that undertone is still there.

As far as alphabet books go, this one is kinda neat, I guess. C certainly thought it was fun, and spent some time poring over the pictures, examining them carefully. This is one of the advantages of these kinds of picture based books – that it is not so much the text as the imagery that does the work. There’s a lot of fun alliteration and so on.

Not as much fun to read, but since C is a relatively new reader, it certainly has its place. Probably the height of the series for me to be honest, which isn’t saying very much. 😉

More about Paddington – Michael Bond

More in the Series – Paddington
“More in the Series” scores the other books in a series where one (or more) of the books have made it into the 1001 Books list. Mostly because I’m a bit of a completionist. 

POINTS: 2 out of 10.

Bechdel: 0 points
Variety of characters: 0 points
Good story:  1 point
Discretionary ideological points: 1 point

Olivia Saves the Circus – Ian Falconer

More in the Series – Olivia
“More in the Series” scores the other books in a series where one (or more) of the books have made it into the 1001 Books list. Mostly because I’m a bit of a completionist. 

POINTS: 4 out of 10.

Bechdel: 1 point
Variety of characters: 0 points
Good story:  2 points
Discretionary ideological points: 1 point

This was our second foray into the Olivia books, and she’s just as charming the second time through. Once again, the book is a tribute to the power of imagination. Olivia tells a story in class about going to the circus and saving the day, playing all the parts in the circus because everyone is sick “with ear infections”.

On being asked by her teacher if it’s true, Olivia says yes, “to the best of my recollection”. The teacher looks mildly exasperated, as if this is the sort of conversation they have a lot.

I’m the parent to a child with an extremely active imagination, who frequently tells me stories that are “really true, Mommy”, and only when I push him on it, does he respond, “not really, but we’re just pretending”. So I am familiar with this sort of thing. 😉

My little storyteller was quite taken with this book. When I asked him if he thought her story was true he responded, “No, I think it’s just pretend.” But I definitely felt like he related.

The book kind of passes the Bechdel, if Mummy qualifies as a name, but since it’s a kids’ book, I’m counting it. (If you’re not a parent you may not yet have discovered that to kids you’re always only ever “Christopher’s Mum!”. It’s a thing. Kids seem to tend to see adults only in relation to other kids a lot of the time.) There’s no diversity to speak of.

I love the gentle, smiling portrayal of imagination. It’s great. The imagery is very simple, much like the first book, but it works.

Very  cute.

 

Hairy Maclary: Scattercat – Lynley Dodd

More in the Series – Hairy Maclary
“More in the Series” scores the other books in a series where one (or more) of the books have made it into the 1001 Books list. Mostly because I’m a bit of a completionist. 

POINTS: 3 out of 10.

Bechdel: 0 points
Variety of characters: 0 points
Good story:  2 points
Discretionary ideological points: 1 point

cover

I’ve said before that the genius of Lynley Dodd is how she makes it look easy. Her words and rhyme are so perfectly constructed that you find yourself thinking there is no other way they could go, and therefore this kind of verse must be easy. The text trips lightly across the page, seeming effortless.

As someone who occasionally writes this kind of thing, it is certainly not effortless. Dodd is kind of a genius. 🙂

This book doesn’t really pass any of our metrics – the characters are all dogs and cats so you can’t really talk about diversity. Some of the cats are female, but there’s no dialogue. It’s just a simple romp of Hairy Maclary chasing all the cats in the neighbourhood until he comes up against one who is scarier than he is.

It’s charming as hell, you guys, and if you still haven’t read a Hairy Maclary book (probably because you don’t live in New Zealand), they are definitely very worth getting your mitts on and reading with your kids. They’re somehow very Kiwi and still completely universal, which is quite a thing to pull off.

This is children’s lit at its best. 🙂 C loves them, they’re fun to read, and I marvel at the brilliantly constructed rhyme schemes. Good stuff.

Alfie: An Evening at Alfie’s – Shirley Hughes

More in the Series – Alfie
“More in the Series” scores the other books in a series where one (or more) of the books have made it into the 1001 Books list. Mostly because I’m a bit of a completionist. 

POINTS: 4 out of 10.

Bechdel: 1 point
Variety of characters:  points
Good story:  2 points
Discretionary ideological points: 1 point

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Anyone who has been reading this for a while will know that I have a lot of respect for the Alfie books. In this one, Alfie and his sister Annie Rose are being babysat by Maureen McNally from next door, when the house begins to flood because of a burst pipe. Water drips from the ceiling and it is all charmingly chaotic.

Despite being very much told from Alfie’s perspective, Maureen calls her mother, Mrs. McNally, for help, and they have a reasonable amount of dialogue about burst pipes and how to deal with the water. This combined with Mrs. McNally trying to soothe a crying Annie Rose gives this book a clear Bechdel pass.

It slid slightly backwards when they had to get Mr McNally before they could successfully turn the water off, but it’s clear that Maureen knows enough about plumbing that she knew that was what needed to be done – she just didn’t know where to do it – and she makes a point of learning where so that she’ll know next time. There is an element of being “rescued by the bloke who knows”, but Maureen makes up for it simply because she thinks she should know, and makes a point of learning – she clearly has plenty of intuitive and agency.

C and I both enjoyed this book as much as we have enjoyed the other Alfie books. They are very real, and feel like a window into the lives of real people. I kind of love the neighbourliness, too. Help your neighbours! It makes for a better world. 😉

Good stuff. Worth a read.